Category Archives: Networking

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HOW TO SEARCH FOR HIDDEN FILES IN WINDOWS

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Have you ever lost some important files in your system? Or do you think some files should be present in your system but you cannot find them? This article analyse the steps in which you can setup your system in order to be able to view hidden files. In some cases, hackers, malwares and viruses have used this ways of hiding their files to destroy your system so that you cannot find those harmful files to delete. But knowing how to discover such unwanted files can prevent your PC from malware or virus attack.

Below are the following steps and various versions of windows

Windows 95

To enable the viewing of Hidden files follow these steps:

  • Close all programs so that you are at your desktop.
  • Double-click on the My Computer icon.
  • Select the View menu and then click Options.
  • After the new window appears select the View tab.
  • Scroll down until you see the Show all files radio button and select it.
  • Press the OK button and close the My Computer window.
  • Now your computer is configured to show all hidden files.

Windows 98

To enable the viewing of Hidden files follow these steps:

  • Close all programs so that you are at your desktop.
  • Double-click on the My Computer icon.
  • Select the View menu and then click Folder Options.
  • After the new window appears select the View tab.
  • Scroll down until you see the Show all files radio button and select it.
  • Press the Apply button and then the OK button and close the My Computer window.
  • Now your computer is configured to show all hidden files.

Windows ME

To enable the viewing of Hidden files follow these steps:

  • Close all programs so that you are at your desktop.
  • Double-click on the My Computer icon.
  • Select the Tools menu and click Folder Options.
  • After the new window appears select the View tab.
  • Under the Hidden files and folders section select the radio button labeled Show hidden files and folders.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide file extensions for known file types.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide protected operating system files.
  • Press the Apply button and then the OK button and shutdown My Computer.
  • Now your computer is configured to show all hidden files.

Windows NT

To enable the viewing of Hidden files follow these steps:

  • Close all programs so that you are at your desktop.
  • Double-click on the My Computer icon.
  • Select the View menu and then click Options.
  • After the new window appears select the View tab.
  • Scroll down until you see the Show all files radio button and select it.
  • Press the OK button and shutdown My Computer.
  • Now your computer is configured to show all hidden files.

Windows 2000

To enable the viewing of Hidden files follow these steps:

  • Close all programs so that you are at your desktop.
  • Double-click on the My Computer icon.
  • Select the Tools menu and click Folder Options.
  • After the new window appears select the View tab.
  • Under the Hidden files and folders section select the radio button labeled Show hidden files and folders.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide file extensions for known file types.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide protected operating system files.
  • Press the Apply button and then the OK button and shutdown My Computer.
  • Now your computer is configured to show all hidden files.

Windows XP and Windows 2003

To enable the viewing of Hidden files follow these steps:

  • Close all programs so that you are at your desktop.
  • Double-click on the My Computer icon.
  • Select the Tools menu and click Folder Options.
  • After the new window appears select the View tab.
  • Put a checkmark in the checkbox labeled Display the contents of system folders.
  • Under the Hidden files and folders section select the radio button labeled Show hidden files and folders.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide file extensions for known file types.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide protected operating system files.
  • Press the Apply button and then the OK button and shutdown My Computer.
  • Now your computer is configured to show all hidden files.

Windows Vista

To enable the viewing of Hidden files follow these steps:

  • Close all programs so that you are at your desktop.
  • Click on the Start button. This is the small round button with the Windows flag in the lower left corner.
  • Click on the Control Panel menu option.
  • When the control panel opens you can either be in Classic View or Control Panel Home view:

 

If you are in the Classic View do the following:

  • Double-click on the Folder Options icon.
  • Click on the View tab.
  • Go to the last step.

If you are in the Control Panel Home view do the following:

  • Click on the Appearance and Personalization link.
  • Click on Show Hidden Files or Folders.
  • Go to step 5.
  • Under the Hidden files and folders section select the radio button labeled Show hidden files and folders.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide extensions for known file types.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide protected operating system files.
  • Press the Apply button and then the OK button.
  • Now Windows Vista is configured to show all hidden files.

Windows 7

To enable the viewing of Hidden files follow these steps. Please note a guide with images that shows the same steps can be found here:

  • Close all programs so that you are at your desktop.
  • Click on the Start button. This is the small round button with the Windows flag in the lower left corner.
  • Click on the Control Panel menu option.
  • When the control panel opens click on the Appearance and Personalization link.
  • Under the Folder Options category, click on Show Hidden Files or Folders.
  • Under the Hidden files and folders section select the radio button labeled Show hidden files, folders, or drives.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide extensions for known file types.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide protected operating system files (Recommended).
  • Press the Apply button and then the OK button.
  • Now Windows 7 is configured to show all hidden files.

Windows 8

To enable the viewing of Hidden files follow these steps. Please note a guide with images that shows the same steps can be found here:

  • From the Windows 8 Start Screen, click on the Control Panel app.
  • When the Control Panel opens scroll down to the bottom and click on the More Settings option.
  • The traditional Windows 8 Control Panel will now open. When it is open, click on the Appearance and Personalization link.
  • Under the Folder Options category, click on Show Hidden Files or Folders.
  • Under the Hidden files and folders section select the radio button labeled Show hidden files, folders, or drives.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide extensions for known file types.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide protected operating system files (Recommended).
  • Press the Apply button and then the OK button.
  • Now Windows 8 is configured to show all hidden files.

Windows 10

To enable the viewing of Hidden files in Windows 10, please follow these steps:

  • From the Windows 10 Start Screen, click on the File Explorer button  on the task bar.
  • When File Explorer opens, click on the View tab and then select Options.
  • When the Folder Options screen opens, click on the View tab.
  • You will now see various settings you can select.
  • Folder Options category, click on Show Hidden Files or Folders.
  • Under the Hidden files and folders section select the radio button labeled Show hidden files, folders, or drives.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide extensions for known file types.
  • Remove the checkmark from the checkbox labeled Hide protected operating system files (Recommended).
  • Press the Apply button and then the OK button.
  • Now Windows 10 is now configured to show all hidden files.

Now, that you have known these steps, you can protect your PC from the presence of malware, viruses and other harmful vices. See how

How to remove a Trojan, Virus, Worm, or other Malware from your PC manually without antivirus

You will be able to see icons not previously there and also you will see a file called desktop.ini all over your PC. There is no problem with these files as they are legitimate hidden files and can be ignored.

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How to Connect Two Monitors To a Computer

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Adding a second monitor to your computer lets you double your computer’s desktop, allowing you to work on one monitor while checking its effects on the other. You can double the size of your cockpit in the latest flight simulator. Or you can keep Facebook or Twitter running on your spare monitor to keep up with your friends. Take note of the following steps:

  • Obtain a new monitor that’s compatible with your computer.

Alternatively, you can use an old monitor from your old computer.

  • Push the plug on the end of your new (or old) second monitor cable into your computer’s video port on the back of your computer.

The cable should only fit into one port, be it DVI, VGA, or HDMI.

  • Plug the cable’s other end into your monitor’s matching port.

Again, this port may be DVI, VGA, or HDMI. Plug the monitor’s power cord into the wall or a power strip, and then turn on your monitors and your computer.

 

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  • Right-click a blank part of the desktop and choose Screen Resolution from the pop-up menu that appears.

Both displays appear listed onscreen.

  • Click the Detect button if Windows can’t find the second monitor. Click the icon that represents your main monitor and choose Make This My Main Display. This step specifies which monitor should display your Start button and taskbar.
  • On that same screen, drag and drop the onscreen monitors until they resemble the way you’ve arranged them on your real desk.

You can tell Windows to spread the desktop to the left or to the right, depending on how you’ve arranged your two monitors. Or, if you work on long spreadsheets, stack the two monitors on top of each other with a shelf to double your rows of numbers.

  • Click OK when you finish.

Windows saves your monitor arrangement.

How to Add another Monitor to Your PC

If your PC have two graphics ports, the system can handle two monitors. It would be like if your body had two necks, you could go shopping for a second head.

The second monitor expands the desktop real estate, allowing you to get more work done! Or to see more stuff at once, if you do multiple work on systems.

Connecting the second monitor works just like connecting the first:

Plug it in, to both the graphics adapter and the power supply. Windows should recognize the second monitor at once. Your job is to configure how the monitor is used. For most folks, the second monitor works as an extension to the first monitor.

In Windows 10, the monitor is instantly recognized and the desktop extended, assuming that the second monitor sits to the right of the main monitor. To adjust the second monitor’s position, resolution, or other settings in Windows 10, follow these steps:

  • Right-click the mouse on the desktop.
  • Choose the Display Settings command.

The Settings app opens, showing a preview of both displays.

If you need to extend the desktop to the second display, from the Multiple Displays menu choose the option “Extend these Displays”.

Drag the preview icon to position the second monitor.

Where you place the second monitor’s Preview icon determines how it interacts with the first monitor.

If you need to set the second monitor’s resolution, scroll down the right side of the Settings window and click the link “Advanced Display Settings”.

Working with dual monitors:

  • Click the monitor before choosing a resolution.
  • Click the Apply button to preview your changes.

If you need to make adjustments, keep repeating the last three Steps above.

  • Close the Settings app window when you’re done configuring the second monitor.

 In Windows 10, the first monitor features the taskbar notifications, date, and time. Also, the Action Center slides in only on the first monitor. Both monitors show the Start button and pinned icons, plus buttons showing any open window.

 In Windows 7, connect the second monitor, and then follow these steps to configure the monitor:

  • Right-click the mouse on the desktop and choose Screen Resolution from the pop-up menu.
  • Click the menu button next to Multiple Displays and choose the Extend These Displays option.

Use the mouse to adjust the two monitor preview icons so that they line up onscreen as they do in the real world.

  • Click OK.

In Windows 7, the taskbar stays on only the main monitor. Otherwise, you can use both monitors in Windows as though your PC had one, huge monitor.

The dual-monitor trick works only when the display adapter features two monitor connectors, such as two white DVI connectors.

If the adapter features a single DVI and then an HDMI, it might not work for two monitors. That’s because DVI splitter cables are available and you might be able to use one to pull off the dual-monitor trick.

Some versions of Windows may not support dual monitors.”

Graphics memory is the limiting factor for the success or failure of a single PC running two monitors. When graphics memory is plentiful, the trick works well. When graphics memory is low, you may see video performance suffer. In that case, lower both monitors’ resolution, to see whether that helps.

How to Replace Your Computer Monitor

Computer monitors grab their video signals from the video circuitry in your computer, so you can tell what type of monitor you need by looking at your computer’s video port — the little connector on the back of your computer where you plug in the monitor’s cable.

  • Determine what video port (or ports) are on your computer.

Fortunately, many computers come with several video ports, so they’re compatible with several types of monitors. You may have an analog (VGA), digital (DVI), or High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) connection.

  • Figure out what features you need (or want) and how much you’re willing to spend.

Smaller monitors are cheaper; larger monitors are more expensive. You can choose between LCD monitors (including widescreen monitors) and HDTV sets. (You can also use an old-style CRT TV, but their low resolution can barely display an icon — don’t bother.)

  • If you have a desktop computer (rather than a laptop), shut down Windows, turn off your computer, and unplug and remove your old monitor.

Unplug your old monitor’s power cord from the wall before you unplug the monitor’s video cable from its little port on the back of your computer’s case.

  • Remove the old monitor from your desktop.

Don’t throw your old monitor into the trash because many monitors contain noxious chemicals.

  • Remove the new monitor from the box, place the monitor on your desk, and push the plug on the end of its cable into your computer’s video port on the back of your computer.

The cable should fit into only one port. If the cable doesn’t fit right, you’re either trying to plug it into the wrong port, or your monitor isn’t compatible with your computer.

  • Plug the cable’s other end into your monitor’s matching port, and plug the monitor’s power cord into the wall or a power strip.

This port can be DVI, VGA, or HDMI.

  • Turn on your monitor and then turn on your computer.

You should be able to see words on the screen as the computer spews its opening remarks.

  • If you bought a fancy monitor with speakers, cameras, or other goodies, plug the cords from the monitor’s speakers or camera into their spots in the back of your computer.

If Windows doesn’t recognize your new monitor’s special features, you probably have to install the drivers that came on the CD that came with the monitor.

Considering Video Card Features

When you decide to buy a new video card, you need to make sure that the video card fits your motherboard and has the chipsets that you want. Also look for these video card features and specifications while you shop:

Onboard random access memory (RAM): Today’s video cards typically have anywhere from 64MB to 512MB of memory.

Buy a card with as much onboard RAM as possible. More RAM equals higher resolutions with more colors on-screen.

Driver and standards support: Any PC video card should fully support the Microsoft DirectX video standards.

Gamers will also appreciate robust OpenGL support (an open video standard used in 3D action games).

Maximum resolution: The higher the resolution a card can produce, the more your monitor can display.

Video capture and TV output: A card with these features can create digital video footage from an analog TV signal and transfer the image you see on your monitor to a TV, VCR, or camcorder.

TV tuner: A card with a built-in TV tuner can turn your PC into a TV set. You can use a traditional antenna or connect the card to your cable or satellite system.

Multiple monitor support: Many new video cards allow you to connect two monitors to one card. You can either see two separate desktops or make the two monitors into a seamless desktop.

MPEG hardware support: A video card with built-in encoding and decoding features can really speed things up when you’re working with MPEG files.

 

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How you can partition your hard-drive in windows

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Do you know you can make one hard-drive to function as two? Partitioning a hard-drive simply means splitting your drives in sections (virtual drives) so you can organize your files, applications. It gives your drives that multi-purpose functions for each section of the drive.

Fortunately, for the purpose of this article we have analyze the steps to partitioning your hard-drive. Though we are focusing on windows 10, but it can work with windows 7 and 8.1 respectively

Windows Disk Management:

 

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One best method you can use to partition your disk-drives is using the windows disk management tool found in windows. Although some third-party applications have expanded features in which you can work with. Below are the steps to follow:

  • Use windows search box at the left bottom of your PC and search for “Disk Management”
  • Select “create and format hard disk partitions” from the result box.
  • Select the hard-drive you wish to partition from the different drives you see

Note: if it is a new drive you are trying to partition, skip the next step

  • Create some “unallocated space” from your old drives when it appears (the one you had select in the previous step) by right-clicking it and select “Shrink Volume” from the resulting drop-down menu.
  • Your PC will then calculate how much free space you can allocate to the new partition. Once it is completed, it will ask how much space you’d want to use
  • If you wish to use all, click “shrink” button. But if you need a specified volume to use, input it in megabytes (e.g 1,025 mb) in the respective field before hitting shrink.
  • Wait for the process to complete depending on the speed of your drive. You will now have a new “unallocated” space shown next to the physical drive in the bottom-half of the Disk Management screen.
  • Right-click the “unallocated” space and select “New simple volume” from the resulting menu
  • Follow instructions from the screen and select the size of the volume ( default will use all unallocated space) and the drive letter
  • If given the option to format your drive (either new or old), please do so. For file system select “NTFS”. The “exFAT” option is more commonly used for portable devices. You can also add a volume label, name if you choose to. You can also choose to leave “unallocated unit size” at default.
  • Select quick format if you don’t have much time to spend.
  • Keep on clicking the “Next” button until you finally hit the finish button to create the volume. There we go, you now have a partitioned drive with different sections to store your information. You will be able to see it and all information about it on the Disk management page.

There are several third-parties alternatives you can use to partition your drives but I recommend EaseUS Partition Master Free because I have used it before and I know how good it is. It comes with several features. Feel free to try this out through these steps if you want to partition your hard-drives…

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How to install and setup a CCTV camera

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I have been searching and researching all through the internet to gain knowledge on how to install a CCTV camera, either at home or at working place. I have found some steps that can help you too start with installation at least if you also want to learn how to install a CCTV camera. These are the steps below:

  • To install a CCTV camera, first of all locate the direction or position you want to install the CCTV camera
  • Before preparing the tools,look out for the areas you need to watch out for like doors, driveways, off-street windows, even open spaces around you.
  • Take note of the type of camera you should buy and how it connects with the DVR box. Either to plug it directly or routing the camera`s cable through your house if the DVR box is placed far from the camera.

 

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Now, you can buy a security camera depending on how you want it. Either you get the one that is coupled together which of course is cheaper and easier, or you buy them individually. Buying them individually, you will need:

  1. DVR (digital video recorder) box
  2. 1-4 cameras
  3. Appropriate wiring (Siamese and BNC cables)
  4. Power cords

There are different types of camera you can buy. We have the wireless and the wired ones

A good example of camera you can buy is NYXCAM 4mp Home Security Camera System

Tools needed to install a wired camera system

  • Ethernet cable
  • A power drill with drive bits and space bits
  • Steel fish tape
  • Masking tape
  • A monitor, mouse, and keyboard

Since you now know the tools to use, you can check the manual that come with the purchased package for a guide to connecting these tools together. A DVR system can be directly connected with a TV or computer monitor for live viewing. Some people may prefer watching footage remotely (online). What you need to do is, to configure port forwarding on your router so that you gain access to your DVR (NVR) from the internet. A simpler solution is using a regular IP cameras with cameraFTP cloud recording.

There are two kinds of recording; cloud and local recording

Cloud recording: this is the kind of recording in which footage cannot be deleted even though it is stolen or the DVR and cameras is destroyed. With this type of recording, you can view or playback recorded footage online with web browser or cameraFTP mobile view apps.

Camera software to use with your cameras are; Blue iris, isPV, Noxcam APP (free) access to certain functions. You can use these softwares with your mobile to record videos on a local micro SD card or do a cloud recording with the monthly subscription. You can live stream, take pictures.

Take the bold step to start your own installation. Be inspired and start working…

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Ways You Can Handle Windows 10 Updates

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Are you confused of what to do when windows 10 updates continuously? You will agree with me that the older version of windows shares how to undo automatic updates, but windows 10 has come up with more complications that varies. And as such many have wondered how its updates can be disabled.

You can check for new updates in settings, though windows 10 don’t give options to review updates and also not to uninstall unlike previous version. Instead, the Microsoft has chosen to install at their own scheduled time. Not to worry though, as this piece will guide you on how to disable that feature and make things clear for you.

We have search for user’s most pressing questions on the use of windows 10 such as:

  • Whether you have to accept all updates
  • Whether you can uninstall existing updates
  • How to reduce the band width some updates use and
  • How to stop all updates.

Windows 10 updates and how to defer them

When it all seemed Microsoft has taken over updates from their products, there are still some options you can make do with in differing updates.

Further reading

Click the start button and select settings

Select updates and security and then

Windows update

That brings up the Windows Update screen, which shows any updates that have been downloaded, as well as any that are waiting to be downloaded.

If you want to check to see if any updates have become available since the last time Windows checked for them, click “Check for updates.” Next to any update that has been downloaded but not yet installed, you’ll see the words, “Status: Awaiting Install.”

Windows 10 automatically downloads update to your pc without installing them and also shows those pending downloads.

On the windows update screen, click

Change active hours

Select hours you typically use your computer/pc

Updates won’t install during those hours.

NB: active hours can’t exceed 18 hours

You can control when Windows installs updates by choosing “active hours,” during which installations shouldn’t take place.

Your system may or may not need to restart in order to install the updates. Typically, updates that add virus definitions for Windows Defender don’t need the system to restart, while other updates do. Your PC will only restart to finish installing the updates during non-active hours. And you even have a bit of control over that. If, for some reason, you want the downloaded update to immediately install, on the Windows Update screen click “Restart now.” And if you want to have your PC restart at a specific time, click “Restart options,” and select the day and time you want your PC to restart.

You can also ask Windows Update to install not just updates to Windows 10, but also for other Microsoft products, such as Microsoft Office. To do that, on the Windows Update screen, click Advanced Options, and on the “Choose how updates are installed section” on the screen that appears, click “Give me updates for other Microsoft products when I update Windows.”

There is a workaround to the must-always-update-immediately rule — assuming you have Windows Professional, Enterprise or Education. In those cases, you have some control over pausing updates. To do it, click the

Start button and select

Settings

Update & Security

Advanced options,

Then go to the box “Choose when updates are installed.” This setting will control whether to defer the twice-yearly upgrade to Windows 10, and how to do it. You have two choices:

Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted): This lets you specify how long after the upgrade is released you want to wait before installing it. In the box below this option, you can choose how many days you want to wait before installing, up to 365.

Semi-Annual: If you choose this, the upgrade will be deferred until after Microsoft has determined it’s ready for businesses to use. That usually takes between three and four months. That’s just the starting point for the deferral, though. In the box below this option, choose a number up to 365. That’s how many days the upgrade will be deferred after Microsoft says the upgrade is fine for businesses to install.

These settings only apply to the twice-annual Windows 10 upgrades. You can also defer the more frequent Windows 10 feature updates. To do it, go to the box marked “A quality update includes…” and in the dropdown box choose the number of days you’d like quality updates deferred. You can choose up to 30 days.

You’ll find an additional setting that’s somewhat confusing — the Pause update setting. Select this and it pauses updates for five days, except Windows Defender updates. Note that this setting takes precedence over the settings outlined in the previous several paragraphs.

There’s also a sneaky, little-known workaround for any version of Windows 10 including Home that can prevent you from installing Windows updates entirely (except for important security updates). But you can’t do it on a case-by-case basis — you either install all updates or none at all. And you can only do it on PCs that are connected to a network via Wi-Fi — if you have an Ethernet connection, it won’t work.

To do it, you need to tell Windows 10 that you’re on a metered connection — in other words, that you’re being charged by how much data you use. Click the Start button and select Settings > Network & Internet > Wi-Fi / Manage known networks. On the screen that appears, scroll to your Wi-Fi network and click Properties. On the screen that appears go to the “Metered connection” setting and set the slider from Off to on.

A sneaky way to stop your PC from installing Windows updates is by Telling Windows you’re on a metered connection.

When you do that, Windows will minimize the data you use, and one of the ways it does that is to stop automatically downloading Windows updates. Keep in mind, though, that if you connect to another Wi-Fi network, you’ll have to turn that setting on for that network as well. If you don’t, updates will happen automatically.

If you’re connected to a network via Ethernet, the “Metered connection” setting won’t appear, so you can’t use the technique.

And finally, Windows Pro users can use the enterprise-level Windows Update for Business (WUB) tool to control the timing of upgrade and update delivery.

View your update history and uninstall updates

Although Windows 10 won’t allow you to pick and choose which updates to install, you can uninstall some updates that cause you problems.

To do it, first see what updates have been installed by clicking

The Start button and selecting

Settings

Update & Security

Windows Update

View installed update history.

You’ll see a list divided into four sections: Feature Updates, Quality Updates, Other Updates and Driver Updates. The Feature Updates section shows what Microsoft often calls upgrades — for example, the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update. However, don’t expect to see that in plain English in the Feature Updates section. Instead, you’ll see the version number Microsoft uses to refer to the upgrade — Windows 10, version 1709 for the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, for example. The Quality Updates section lists the more mundane, and more frequent, updates to Windows that fix bugs, improve security and add minor features. The Other Updates lists miscellaneous other updates, such as to the Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool. And the Driver Updates, as the name implies, shows all the drivers that have been updated.

Here’s a list of all updates on a Windows 10 PC.

You get information about any of the updates slightly differently, depending on whether you’re looking for details about a feature update, a quality update or an “other” or driver type of update. For feature updates, on the “View installed update history screen,” go to the Feature Updates section, look for the update for which you want details, and underneath the date it was installed, click “See what’s new in this update.” For quality updates, go to the Quality Updates section, look for the update for which you want details and click it. For other updates, go to the Other Updates section, look for the update for which you want details and click it. To see driver updates, go to the Driver Updates section, and click the update for which you want details.

When you click to get details about a feature update, you’ll be sent to a page full of tips, videos and other content about the update. For quality, driver and other updates, you’ll be sent to a web page with a detailed written description of the update.

If you want to uninstall an upgrade like Windows 10, version 1709, listed in Feature Updates, you’ll have to do it within 10 days of the upgrade being installed. After that point you’re out of luck; the update will stay. Even if you do want to uninstall it in that 10-day time period it’s quite complicated to do. Your best bet for doing it is to follow the instructions Microsoft offers in “How to Use the Rollback Function in Windows 10 1709, 1703 and Earlier Versions of Windows 10.”

To uninstall updates listed in Quality Updates, Other Updates and Driver Updates.

To do it, select

Settings

Update & Security

Windows Update

View installed update history.

To uninstall an update, click “Uninstall updates” at the top of the screen. On the screen that appears, click on the update you want to get rid of, then click Uninstall.

Note, though, that you won’t be able to uninstall all updates. Not every update listed in the “View installed update history” will appear on the screen that lets you uninstall updates, and you can’t uninstall any that don’t appear there. And when you click some updates that do appear on the uninstall updates screen, the uninstall button vanishes.

In some instances, you may be able to make sure that Windows 10 won’t reinstall the update you’ve uninstalled, using a free Microsoft tool to essentially hide it from Windows Update. To do it, go to this page, scroll toward the bottom and click the “Download the ‘Show or hide updates’ troubleshooter package now.” link. Install the download, click Next, and follow the instructions for hiding the update you don’t want reinstalled.

Getting into the fast lane with the Insider Program

Are you the kind of person who needs to be first in the technology know and wants the latest version of Windows before its general release? If so, you’ll want to become part of Microsoft’s Windows Insider Program. When you do that, you’ll get the latest Windows updates before everyone else. Keep in mind, though, that when you do this, you’re somewhat of a guinea pig, because Microsoft uses the program to find bugs and problems with updates.

If it’s something you want to do, head to the Windows Insider page and sign up. Then on your PC, click the Start button, select Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update > Windows Insider Program and click Get Started. You’ll be warned that you’ll be using software that might not be fully tested. If you still want to go ahead, click Next.

After that comes an even scarier notice that warns you that “if you ever want to stop receiving Insider Preview builds you may need to remove everything from your PC and reinstall Windows.” If you’re still not scared, click Confirm. You’ll then have to restart your PC.

After your PC restarts, click the

Start button and select

Settings

Update & Security

Windows Update

Windows Insider Program.

You’ll see in the “Get Insider Preview builds” section that you’ll now receive Insider Preview builds.

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You have a choice of receiving the Insider Preview builds as soon as they’re released or after they’ve been tested a while (but before they’re released to the general public). Microsoft calls these options the “fast ring” and “slow ring.” To choose one of the rings, in the “What kind of content would you like to receive?” section, select “Active Development of Windows.” Then in the “What pace do you want to get new builds?” section, choose either the Fast or Slow ring. At any time, you can come back here and switch between them.

Choosing which ring you’d like to be on as a Windows Insider.

You have another set of choices as well, separate from the fast and slow rings. In the ““What kind of content would you like to receive?” section, the dropdown menu offers these three choices:

Just fixes, apps, and drivers: Select this and rather than getting any new Windows builds more quickly, you only get bug fixes, driver updates and app updates more quickly.

Active development of Windows: Choose this, and as outlined previously, you get the choice of being put into the fast or slow ring for updates.

Skip ahead to the next Windows release: When you choose this, you skip over the previews for the next upgrade of Windows, and instead you get previews for the upgrade after that. Note that you’ll only get these updates at the point when the next Windows upgrade is nearly finished and with few previews left, and the version after that is in very early development.

If you want to opt out of getting Insider Preview builds, click “Stop Insider Previews” at the very top of the screen. You have three choices form the screen that appears:

Move to a less risky and less frequent schedule: You can pretty much ignore this option, because not only is it extremely confusing, but it uses terminology that Microsoft abandoned in late July 2017, and it duplicates the settings described in the three previous bullet points. So don’t bother to click.

Pause updates for a bit: Click here and from the screen that appears move the slider from Off to On, and you’ll pause updates from being installed for seven days.

Roll me back to the last Windows version: This selection brings you to the Settings’ Recovery section which allows you to roll your PC back to the latest public version of Windows. So you’ll wipe out all preview releases and go back to being on the normal Windows update schedule.

Use peer-to-peer networking to install updates

When it comes to updating Windows 10, Microsoft borrowed a technique from peer-to-peer networking apps such as BitTorrent in order to help distribute updates more efficiently. If you want, you can tell Windows 10 that you want updates delivered from other PCs via peer-to-peer networking in addition to getting them from Microsoft servers.

Why would you want to do this? If you have multiple Windows 10 PCs on a network, you can save bandwidth, because the update can be delivered from Microsoft’s servers to one PC on your network, and that PC can then deliver the update to the other Windows 10 PCs.

To turn this feature on, click the Start button and select Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update > Advanced options > Delivery Optimization. Underneath the “Allow downloads from other PCs” section, move the slider to On, then choose “PCs on my local network.” If you choose “PCs on my local network, and PCs on the Internet,” the PCs on your network will get updates from other PCs on the internet — but your PCs will also send updates to those other PCs as well, and so you could end up using additional bandwidth.

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